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The man who survived two atomic bombings

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Tsutomu Yamaguchi, reportedly the "unluckiest man in the world," survived both the atomic bombing at Hiroshima and later on at Nagasaki. Yamaguchi was the only person among 70 people evacuated from Hiroshima to Nagasaki, who survived the second blast. Despite that, he lived a long life until he passed away from stomach cancer at 93 years old. One could also argue that he was in fact the luckiest man in the world. Tsutomu Yamaguchi during an interview in 2005 Reportedly the unluckiest man in the world, Mr. Tsutomu Yamaguchi, was A-bombed at Hiroshima. Later he relocated to Nagasaki, where he survived the second A-bomb attack.  Yamaguchi was the only person among 70 people evacuated from Hiroshima to Nagasaki, who survived the second blast. More surprising is that the two atomic bombs barely affected his life span, as he died of cancer at 93. One could also argue that he was in fact the luckiest man in the world.  Yamaguchi, a resident of Nagasaki, was in Hiroshima for a busin

Share Of University Degrees Going To Women

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This week we take a look at the share of university degrees going to women. Our data begins in the 1869-1870 school year when 1378 women got a Bachelor's degree ,   and none got either a  Master's or a  Doctor's degree.  Things may look a bit bleak, but it must be taken into account that the numbers for men were 7,993, zero, and 1 respectively. While the numbers for women were low at the time, they began to steadily increase over the years and for the 1939-1940 school year, 76,954 got a Bachelor's, 10,223 got a Master's and 429 got a Doctor's degree. Unfortunately, there is no data available for the years the United States participated in World War II . However, we can compare the number of degrees awarded in 1940 and 1950 to see the difference in both the numbers and the genders of the recipients. In 1940, a total of 186,500 bachelor's degrees were given, with 109,546 going to men and 76,954 going to women.  In 1950, the number of bachelor'